Peer-Reviewed


  1. Smith, R.J., A.N. Gray, and M.E. Swanson. 2020. Peak plant diversity during early forest development in the western United States. Forest Ecology and Management. doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2020.118410.

  2. Smith, R.J., S. Jovan, and B. McCune. 2020. Climatic niche limits and community-level vulnerability of obligate symbioses. Journal of Biogeography 47(2): 382-395. doi:10.1111/jbi.13719 (with equations)

  3. Smith, R.J., S. Jovan, D. Stanton, and S. Will-Wolf. 2020. Epiphytic macrolichen communities indicate climate and air quality in the US Midwest. The Bryologist. Accepted.

  4. Smith, R.J., S. Jovan, and S. Will-Wolf. 2020. Lack of congruence between terrestrial and epiphytic lichen strata in boreal Alaska. The Lichenologist. Accepted.

  5. Smith, R.J., and A.N. Gray. 2019. Combining potentially incompatible community datasets when harmonizing forest inventories in subarctic Alaska. Journal of Vegetation Science 30(1): 18–29. doi:10.1111/jvs.12694

  6. Smith, R.J., P.R. Nelson, S. Jovan, P.J. Hanson, and B. McCune. 2018. Novel climates reverse carbon uptake of atmospherically-dependent epiphytes: climatic constraints on the iconic boreal forest lichen Evernia mesomorpha. American Journal of Botany 105: 266–274. doi:10.1002/ajb2.1022

  7. Smith, R.J., S. Jovan, A.N. Gray, and B. McCune. 2017. Sensitivity of carbon stores in boreal forest moss mats: effects of vegetation, topography and climate. Plant and Soil 421(1): 31–42. doi:10.1007/s11104-017-3411-x

  8. Smith, R.J. 2017. Solutions for loss of information in high-beta-diversity community data. Methods in Ecology and Evolution 8(1): 68–74. doi:10.1111/2041-210X.12652

  9. Calabria, L.M., K. Petersen, S.T. Hamman, and R.J. Smith. 2016. Prescribed fire decreases lichen and bryophyte biomass and alters functional group composition in Pacific Northwest prairies. Northwest Science 90(4): 470–483. doi:10.3955/046.090.0407

  10. Smith, R.J., J.C. Benavides, S. Jovan, M. Amacher, and B. McCune. 2015. A rapid method for landscape assessment of carbon storage and ecosystem function in moss and lichen ground layers. The Bryologist 118(1): 32–45. doi:10.1639/0007-2745-118.1.032

  11. Smith, R.J., and J.H. Rausch. 2015. Bryophytes and lichens from Malheur National Forest, Blue Mountains of eastern Oregon. Evansia 32(2): 78–96. doi:10.1639/079.032.0201

  12. Rosso, A., P. Neitlich, and R.J. Smith. 2014. Non-destructive lichen biomass estimation in northwestern Alaska: a comparison of methods. PLoS ONE 9(7): e103739. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0103739

  13. Smith, R.J., and L.R. Stark. 2014. Habitat vs. dispersal constraints on bryophyte diversity in the Mojave Desert, USA. Journal of Arid Environments 102: 76–81. doi:10.1016/j.jaridenv.2013.11.011

  14. Smith, R.J., S.R. Abella, and L.R. Stark. 2014. Post-fire recovery of desert mosses: effects of fires and soil-banks. Journal of Vegetation Science 25: 447–456. doi:10.1111/jvs.12094

  15. Smith, R.J. 2013. Cryptic diversity in bryophyte soil-banks along a desert elevational gradient. Lindbergia 36: 1–8. [PDF]

  16. Smith, R.J. et al. 2012. Rare inland reindeer lichens at Mima Mounds in southwest Washington State. North American Fungi 7(3): 1–25. doi:10.2509/naf2012.007.003

 

Reports and Other


  1. Pattison, R., H.E. Andersen, A.N. Gray, B. Schulz, R.J. Smith, and S. Jovan. 2018. Forests of the Tanana Valley State Forest and Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska: Results of 2014 Pilot Inventory. PNW-GTR-967. USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station, Portland, OR. 80p.

  2. Smith, R.J., S. Jovan and B. McCune. 2017. Lichen Communities as Climate Indicators in the U.S. Pacific States. PNW-GTR-952. USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station, Portland, OR. 44p. link

  3. Smith, R.J. 2017. Realized and Potential Climate Responses of Lichen and Bryophyte Communities in a National Forest Inventory. PhD dissertation. Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR. 135p.

  4. Smith, R.J., S. Jovan, and B. McCune. 2017. Lichen responses to experimental temperature and CO2 enhancement: implications for climate change monitoring. Pages 163–168 in: Potter, K., and B. Conkling, eds. Forest Health Monitoring: National Status, Trends, and Analysis 2016. GTR-SRS-222. USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station, Asheville, NC.

  5. Heath, L.S., S.M. Anderson, M.R. Emery, J.A. Hicke, J. Littell, A. Lucier, J.G. Masek, D.L. Peterson, R. Pouyat, K.M. Potter, G. Robertson, J. Sperry, A. Bytnerowicz, S. Jovan, M.H. Mockrin, R. Musselman, B.K. Schulz, R.J. Smith, and S.I. Stewart. 2015. Indicators of Climate Impacts for Forests: Recommendations for the US National Climate Assessment Indicators System. GTR-NRS-155. USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, Newtown Square, PA. 143p.

  6. Smith, R.J., S. Jovan and B. McCune. 2015. Evaluating carbon stores at the earth–atmosphere interface: moss and lichen mats of subarctic Alaska. Page 55 in: Stanton, S., and G. A. Christensen. 2015. Pushing Boundaries: New Directions in Inventory Techniques & Applications. GTR-PNW-931. USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station, Portland, OR.

  7. Smith, R.J., S. Jovan and B. McCune. 2014. Ubiquitous moss and lichen mats promote forest health. Pages 68–69 in: Graham, E., and T. Huette, eds. Forest Health Conditions in Alaska 2013: A Forest Health Protection Report. R10-PR-035. USDA Forest Service, Region 10, Anchorage, AK.

  8. Smith, R.J. 2013. Dispersal Ecology of Desert Mosses Along Gradients of Elevation, Wildfire Disturbance and Local Niche. MSc thesis. Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas. 90p.

 

Submitted


  1. Smith, R.J., and A.N. Gray. Why measure Wilderness? Socioecological benefits of monitoring protected areas. Frontiers in Ecology and Environment. In review.

  2. Smith, R.J., S. Jovan and S. Will-Wolf. Lack of congruence between terrestrial and epiphytic lichen strata in boreal forests. The Lichenologist. In review.

  3. Smith, R.J., S. Jovan, D. Stanton, and S. Will-Wolf. 2020. Epiphytic macrolichen communities indicate climate and air quality in the US Midwest. The Bryologist. In review.

 

Invited Presentations


  1. Bridging scales: forecasting forest dynamics under shifting regimes. School of the Environment, Washington State University. Pullman, WA. 3 March 2020.

  2. Forecasting forest dynamics under atmospheric stresses. Environmental Sciences Department, Dickinson College. Carlisle, PA. 19 Feb 2020.

  3. Dimensions of mentoring in international STEM disciplines. Office of International Programs, Global Services, Washington State University. Pullman, WA. 20 Apr 2019.

  4. Keynote: Conceptual progress in lichen ecology through research coordination networks. American Bryological and Lichenological Society Annual Meeting, Niwot Ridge, Colorado. 14 Aug 2018.

 

Oral Presentations


  1. Applications of critical loads and monitoring data in Wilderness Stewardship Performance. Lead: Peter Mali. National Atmospheric Deposition Program, Spring Meeting, Madison, WI. 11 May 2020.

  2. Global biomass of ground-dwelling lichens and mosses. Northwest Scientific Assoc., Lewiston, ID. 27 Mar 2019.

  3. Harmonizing forest inventories in interior Alaska: resolving ecological vs sampling differences. International Association for Vegetation Science, Bozeman, MT. 27 Jul 2018.

  4. Climatic vulnerability of forest lichen communities in North America. USFS Forest Inventory and Analysis Stakeholder Symposium, Park City, UT. 23 Oct 2017.

  5. An interactive web tool to assess climate vulnerability of forest lichen communities. Ecological Society of America, Portland, OR. 8 Aug 2017.

  6. Vulnerability of forest lichen communities to species loss under climatic warming. Northwest Scientific Assoc., Ashland, OR. 31 Mar 2017.

  7. Overview of the FIA Ground Layer Indicator. (S. Jovan lead author, with R.J. Smith, A. Gray and B. McCune). Interior Alaska Forest Inventory Collaborators Meeting, Fairbanks, AK. 1 Dec 2016.

  8. Decline of boreal lichens over one year of whole-ecosystem warming. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, SPRUCE Project Meeting. St. Paul, MN. 1 Nov 2016.

  9. Twenty-five years of climate indication in lichen communities from Alaska to California. Botany Conference: American Bryological and Lichenological Society, Savannah, GA. 1 Aug 2016.

  10. Local and regional climate responses of epiphytic lichen communities in the US Midwest. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, SPRUCE Experiment All-Hands Meeting. St. Paul, MN. 10 May 2016.

  11. Twenty-five years of climate indication in lichen communities from Alaska to California. Northwest Scientific Assoc., Bend, OR. 25 Mar 2016.

  12. Evaluating carbon stores at the earth-atmosphere interface: moss and lichen mats of subarctic Alaska. Forest Inventory and Analysis Science Symposium, Portland, OR, USA. 9 Dec 2015.

  13. A method for assessing carbon storage and functional importance in moss and lichen ground layers. Northwest Scientific Assoc., Missoula, MT. 28 Mar 2014.

  14. Assessing carbon storage and functional importance in moss/lichen ground layers. Interior Alaska Inventory Conference, Anchorage, AK. 6 Feb 2014.

  15. Post-fire recovery of desert moss communities. SoBeFree Annual Meeting, Julian, CA. 28 Mar 2013.

  16. Dispersal and post-fire recovery of desert mosses. NV Native Plant Society. Henderson, NV. 4 Feb 2013.

  17. Ecology of rare inland reindeer lichens. Northwest Scientific Assoc., Boise, ID. 30 Mar 2012.

 

Poster Presentations


  1. Smith, R.J., S. Jovan, A.N. Gray, and B. McCune. Three-dimensional carbon storage in interior Alaska’s moss and lichen mats. FIA Alaska Stakeholder Meeting, Anchorage, AK. 1 Dec 2016.

  2. Smith, R.J., P.R. Nelson, S. Jovan, and B. McCune. Climate change effects on lichen communities and growth. Forest Health Monitoring Program Workgroup Meeting. 24 Mar 2016.

  3. Smith, R.J., S. Jovan, and B. McCune. Carbon storage and functional importance in moss/lichen ground layers. Forest Health Monitoring Program Workgroup, Jacksonville, FL. 25–27 Mar 2014.

  4. Smith, R.J. Mining for mosses: Metacommunity dynamics at Red Rock Canyon, Nevada. Ecological Society of America, Portland, OR. 10 Aug 2012.